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Requirements

All students must complete a minimum of 102 semester hours of graduate study plus 3 hours of internship credit, for a total of 105 semester hours. In addition to coursework, students must pass the comprehensive examination, complete an introductory practicum or thesis, and complete at least two doctoral practica (supervised clinical training in the community), a pre-doctoral internship, and a doctoral project.

The standard course load for a full-time student in the PsyD program is 12 semester hours each fall and spring semester and from one to three courses in summer semesters. Students must complete at least 30 semester hours of work in a 24-month period. For at least one of those two years, the student must be at Roosevelt on a full-time basis. Thus, students must complete at least two consecutive semesters of full-time study before becoming eligible for the doctoral degree.

The PsyD program may accept credit for substantially equivalent graduate-level coursework completed at approved universities or schools of professional psychology, up to 27 credits. A maximum of 36 semester hours of credit may be waived with approval of the doctoral program advisor for those entering with a master’s degree; a maximum of 27 credits may be transferred for those entering with a BA or BS. Credit is granted only for courses in which the grade obtained was a B or higher and only if the courses were taken within seven years prior to the beginning of the student’s doctoral program. Students entering with a master’s degree will meet with the Director of the PsyD Program to identify which required courses will be waived based on their previous graduate work. The doctoral project, internship, and at least six semester hours of practicum must be completed at Roosevelt University.

Courses taken in the PsyD program more than seven years before the semester in which the graduate degree is to be granted may not be counted toward the degree. There is a maximum limit of 10 years for completion of all components of the program, including the pre-doctoral internship and the doctoral project. Students who have not completed the program by 10 years will be dismissed. Students' progress will be evaluated at the seven-year point; if progress has not been adequate, students may be dismissed from the program.

Other Requirements

Clinical Practicum
Comprehensive examination
Pre-doctoral internship
Scholarship
Doctoral project
Academic standards
Student evaluations
Policy regarding practice of psychology by graduate students

Comprehensive examination

The comprehensive examination provides an opportunity for students to review and integrate their knowledge of the theory, research, and practice of clinical psychology. The examination is taken after students have completed at least 72 semester hours of coursework, including Psyc 791A and B (one complete doctoral practicum). If a student does not pass the examination, he or she may retake it once. If the student is unable to pass it the second time, the student will be dismissed from the program.

Pre-doctoral internship

All students must complete a 1-year, full-time pre-doctoral internship approved by the Director of Training. To be eligible to begin a pre-doctoral internship, students must have finished all course work and practica, and must have passed the comprehensive examination, and must have defended their doctoral project proposal by October 31.

Students are expected to seek internships accredited by the American Psychological Association (APA) accredited internship training, and APA-accredited internship programs will be given highest priority. Although the internship should be completed as a one-year full-time experience, it may be completed half time within a two-year period (after review of the internship site’s program and with approval of the Director of Training).

Obtaining an internship is a competitive national process, involving an electronic matching system. Students need to prepare to look outside of large metropolitan areas to increase the likelihood of obtaining an internship. The Director of Training will provide guidance throughout this process.

Scholarship

The scholarship component of the Program’s practitioner-scholar model is addressed by several components, including coursework, the optional thesis, the Comprehensive Examination, and the doctoral project. Students may further their scholarship skills by participating in faculty or independent research (which often involves posters, presentations, and publications). Students who have completed the requirements for the master’s degree are eligible to teach undergraduate courses in psychology once they have taken the Instructor Development Seminar (or if they are taking it concurrently with their first teaching experience). Students are paid for their teaching and may have multiple opportunities for teaching.

Doctoral project

Students develop and enhance scholarly skills pertinent to the practice of clinical psychology by completing a doctoral project. In the doctoral project, students demonstrate their ability to assess and integrate the research literature on the management and conceptualization of clinical issues. There are five types of projects: a traditional empirical study, a case study, a review of the literature on a selected topic, applied program research such as grant proposals, and treatment and program evaluations. Psyc 530 Advanced Research Methods and Psyc 789 Doctoral Project Seminar help prepare students for the doctoral project. Students may begin informal work on their doctoral project at any time and are expected to begin such work by the start of their third year in the program, at the latest. At the end of the doctoral project seminar, students must have completed a formal doctoral project proposal and selected three faculty members who agree to constitute their doctoral project committee.

The doctoral project is to be conducted under the guidance of this three-person doctoral committee, which determines when the project is acceptable and conducts the final oral defense of the project. The final oral defense is a public event and is expected to be held on the University campus with all committee members present. At least two members of the committee, including the committee chair, must be full-time or half-time members of the Roosevelt University Department of Psychology faculty. The committee chair serves as the project director. One committee member may be from another program, an adjunct faculty member, or a psychologist supervising work at a practicum placement. See the current PsyD Doctoral Project Manual for details on the doctoral project.

As noted above, students must have successfully defended their doctoral project proposal by October 31 before they are eligible to apply for internship. If October 31 falls on a weekend, the proposal defense must occur by the Friday before.

Academic standards

PsyD students must maintain a 3.25 cumulative grade-point average. Students who earn a C in a course must retake the course. Students who earn a C for either semester of practicum, must repeat the entire, year long practicum sequence. Students who earn a D or F or a second C in any course will be dismissed from the program. PsyD students may also be dismissed from the program for lack of progress on a thesis or doctoral project if they do not meet a deadline decided by their thesis or doctoral project chair and the PsyD Program Director.

Student evaluations

The PsyD program at Roosevelt University is accountable to the profession and the public for the development of the professional standards of its future practitioners. Thus the successful completion of the program entails development of academic knowledge and skills, professional skills, and interpersonal competencies necessary to function as an effective practitioner. Professional and interpersonal competencies include, but are not limited to, the ability to cultivate and maintain productive and respectful relationships across academic and clinical settings; the ability to respond productively to feedback and change problematic behavior that interferes or has the potential to interfere with one’s ability to function as a student and trainee; and the ability to act in an ethical manner following cultural and professional standards.

The faculty will provide feedback on students’ academic and professional development throughout the program. Students will be formally evaluated each year; students may be evaluated more frequently when concerns arise. Students are evaluated via a collaborative process that involves faculty and clinical training supervisors. Failure to meet the above standards may result in specific remediation requirements or dismissal from the program. Failure of a practicum or internship is also grounds for dismissal from the program.

Practice of psychology by graduate students

PsyD students who render psychological services (other than practicum-related services) must report their activities to the Director of the PsyD Program. If this activity is not within the student’s competence and under professional supervision, as determined by the Director, the student will be asked to desist. Failure to comply with this regulation will be grounds for immediate termination from the psychology doctoral program.