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Aftermath Project: War Is Only Half the Story
This is the first of an ongoing series that give a broad and incisive view of the aftermath of conflict, of the kinds of stories that all too often go untold—the kinds of stories that must be told if we are ever to understand the true cost of war and the real price of peace. This exhibit shows aftermath in postwar reconstruction in Laos, Haiti’s ongoing and continuing political violence, and a survey of sites in Argentina where women and their children were abducted between 1976 and 1983. Click arrow on left or right side to see more images.
Photo by Andrew Stanbridge
Photo by Andrew Stanbridge
Aftermath Project: War Is Only Half the Story
War is divisible into three parts—of which the actual battling, the ferocious and most popularly recorded aspect of the phenomenon, is but one. The consequences of war are an obvious second, and just the actual fighting can often be about majesty and spectacle and sometime heroism, so its consequences are too often heroic also, though on a far, far grander scale.


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Photo by Andrew Stanbridge
Photo by Andrew Stanbridge
Aftermath Project: War Is Only Half the Story
They become, most often, a matter of record: history takes note of the causes of war and then it records what the war itself caused, eventually consigning the results to the atlases and archives, and, of course, to the history books themselves.





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Photo by Asim Rafiqui
Photo by Asim Rafiqui
Aftermath Project: War Is Only Half the Story
But there is a further dimension to this story, the occasional surfacing of a third aspect to war, and one that doggedly remains something of a mystery. It is a dimension of the fighting to be found lurking in the interstices of the greater narrative, something that is almost furtive, fugitive, secret.



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Photo by Asim Rafiqui
Photo by Asim Rafiqui
Aftermath Project: War Is Only Half the Story
It is what lies between War and the Consequence of War—or, if you like, it is what lies, half-hidden, between War and Peace. It is a period that can rightly be regarded as the temporal no-man’s-land of the conflict. This is the unsung and in-between third part of war: the Aftermath.





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Photo by Asim Rafiqui
Photo by Asim Rafiqui

Aftermath Project: War is Only Half the Story

September 11, 2008–January 9, 2009

About the photographers
Paula Luttringer was born in La Plata, Argentina, in 1955. Her studies in botany were cut short in 1977, when she fled Argentina to live in exile after having been kidnapped and held for five months in a secret detention center. Upon returning to Argentina in 1995, she turned to photography as a means of expression. The subject matter of her photographic work concerns the meeting point between her country’s recent history and her own personal one.

Asim Rafiqui an independent photographer based in Stockholm, Sweden. He has been working professionally since 2003 and has been focusing on issues related to the aftermath of conflict. This focus has led him to produce work from Iraqi Kurdistan, Haiti, Israel, The Palestinian Occupied Territories and the tribal areas of Pakistan. He has also regularly shot assignments for magazines like National Geographic (France), Stern (Germany), The Wall Street Journal Magazine, Newsweek, and Time (USA, Asia). He authors the blog site called The Spinning Head, and also the essays that accompany his latest India work at The Idea of India project website.

Andrew Stanbridge enjoys moving from place to place by any means possible, always looking. I fotograph the arcane, the banal, the believers and disbelievers and most of the things in between.

Press about the Exhibition: 
  • CAN-TV—Interview with The Aftermath Project founder, Sara Terry