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Border Film Project
Border Film Project is a collaborative art project giving disposable cameras to two groups on different sides of the border: undocumented migrants crossing the desert into the United States, and American Minutemen trying to stop them. To date, the project has received 73 cameras—38 from migrants and 35 from Minutemen—with nearly 2,000 pictures in total. The pictures show the human face of immigration, and they challenge us to question our stereotypes and to see through new and personal lenses. Click arrow on left or right side to see more images.
Anonymous Photographer
Anonymous Photographer
Border Film Project
To recruit migrant photographers, project coordinators visited migrant shelters and other humanitarian organizations on the Mexican side of the border. In the busiest areas, these shelters housed dozens of migrants every night, providing them dinner, a place to sleep, and sometimes clothes and medicine for the journey. They met the migrants in groups and told them about the project. Many expressed a profound desire to show American citizens what they had to endure to arrive in the United States. Click arrow on left or right side to see more images.
Anonymous Photographer
Anonymous Photographer
Border Film Project
Cameras were distributed to Minutemen volunteers at observation sites in Arizona, New Mexico, Texas, and California. During observations, volunteers camp out from sunset to sunrise, silently staring into the pitch-black darkness of the desert. When they spot migrants and smugglers, they avoid direct confrontation and instead call the Border Patrol. Time spent with the Minutemen gave project coordinators a view of the so-called “vigilantes” that was much more nuanced than the caricatures painted by the media. Click arrow on left or right side to see more images.
Anonymous Photographer
Anonymous Photographer
Border Film Project
Project coordinators realized that volunteers are by and large concerned Americans, trying to do their part to make the United States a safer place and to protect American jobs. Many are retired veterans or have backgrounds in law enforcement. They have continued their lives of public service by volunteering to do what they believe the U.S. government should be doing—regaining control of the U.S. border with Mexico.


Click arrow on left or right side to see more images.
Anonymous Photographer
Anonymous Photographer
Border Film Project
Migrants and Minutemen have very different backgrounds, yet they share one profound belief: both sides would agree that they are documenting a situation that should not be happening. U.S. border policy is broken and needs to be fixed.






Last image in slideshow.
Anonymous Photographer
Anonymous Photographer

Border Film Project

January 28–March 21, 2008 

About the Border Film Project Coordinators
Brett Huneycutt’s studies and experience have focused on development in Latin America. With a Fulbright grant, he conducted econometric research and in-depth interviews about migration and the informal economy in El Salvador. He has organized seminars on the U.S.-Mexico border, an immersion experience to a Zapatista refugee camp in Chiapas, and dental clinics in two rural Salvadoran villages. Brett graduated first in his class from Boston College with a B.A. in Economics, and then completed an M.Phil. in Economics at Oxford as a Rhodes Scholar. He now works at McKinsey & Company in New York City. He ultimately hopes to pursue a career related to economic development, through business and economic policymaking.

Victoria Criado graduated from Boston College in 2003 with a BA in Political Science. As an undergraduate, Victoria led two immersion trips to Tijuana, Mexico, focusing on immigration and border issues. During the summer of 2002, Victoria received a scholarship for a 3-month internship at the Business Council for the United Nations. She is currently an Associate within the Risk & Capital Management Division of Deutsche Bank on Wall Street covering Emerging Markets-Latin America. She speaks Spanish + English fluently. On good days she can get by with French, and on even better days she can navigate through basic Japanese. Victoria enjoys running, reading books by dead poets & existentialist philosophers, writing prose, and watching the circus that is US media. She also has the strange habit of collecting odd-looking, and somewhat deformed, stuffed animals–she is afraid no one else will buy them if she doesn’t. Like most people her age, she wonders what ‘life fulfillment’ means and thinks ‘bios’ are pretty square. She hopes to get her Master’s or possibly PhD before she turns 35.

Rudy Adler is an artist/writer currently living in Brookyn, NY. His current source of inspiration comes from an enormous orange cat in the backyard behind his apartment where he sleeps in the living room.

Learn more about the Border Film Project